GSoC 2017 Project – OpenWifi: LEDE/OpenWRT configuration Mangement

GSoC 2017 – OpenWifi

Hi, my name is Johannes Wegener and I’ll be working on OpenWifi this Google Summer of Code. I’m 27 years old and study computer engineering at TU Berlin. In this blog post I’m going to explain to you what OpenWifi is and what should be done during this summer of code.

What is OpenWifi?

OpenWifi is a OpenWRT/LEDE configuration management system. It is intended to manage a bigger or smaller amount of OpenWRT/LEDE devices.

If a new access point joins a network it is be able to auto detect the management Server and register to it. After the node has been registered its configuration (static configuration like what you’ll typically find in /etc/config/ on OpenWRT/LEDE devices) will be downloaded by the server and stored in a database.

It is now possible to query and modify aspects of the configuration. It also possible to change values depending on other values. This means configuration changes can be applied to a lot of different routers. There is an older templating system which shall be replaced by a new graph-oriented one. It also manages SSH-Keys, has a rudimentary file upload functionality (for uploading new images for example) and extensible API. It is possible for example for a node to ask for an image it should install. (Currently this is not very dynamic – but it is intended that an image could be selected on various parameters)

The Server also regularly pulls the health-state of the node and displays it in an overview. Furthermore the server acts as a luci2 proxy.

It is also extensible via PlugIns and is able to serve as an entry point to other services like icinga or location services. (Both already have a proof of concept PlugIn available)

How does it work? aka what makes it tick?

The main software is written in python and uses the pyramid framework and sqlalchemy as ORM. It uses pyramid-rpc for json-rpc requests (which is used for nodes to register for example) and cornice for a REST-style API (which is intended for the user of the system). The Core-System can be found in this repository.

Most of the tasks operating on nodes are done by a jobserver that uses celery – so that they don’t block the main thread.

All Webviews have been moved to a different repository and are realised in fact as a PlugIn. (If you just want to manage your nodes on CLI/with scripts this will be possible in the near future!)

The nodes use a notification script written as a shell script. It uses a fixed DNS entry (openwifi), a configuration file (/etc/config/openwifi) or mdns (using umdns or avahi) to detect a server and register to it. The packages can be found in the openwifi-feed repository. There is also a boot-flasher which is intended for flashing an alix2-style board from ramfs – since it is also possible to execute commands on the node I’ll integrate an update solution that uses sysupgrade.

The communication between the server and the node is realized currently via rpcd. But one goal during this Google Summer of Code is to abstract that and realize it via a rpcd-communication-PlugIn – this would make it possible to also a NetJSON-communication-PlugIn for example.

The PlugIns are realized with python entry points. There are some special named entry points which will extend the main application. You could have a look at the example plugin to get an idea how it works.

How to try it?

You can easily try the software with docker. Navigate to the Docker directory – there three files that will assist you with the setup. In conf.sh you setup if you want to use LDAP for authentication, avahi for mdns announcement and dnsmasq as dhcp server in the docker container.

With build_image.sh you build the docker image. It tries to detect if you need to use sudo for docker or not. Last but not least you need run_image.sh to start the image.

You can easily add PlugIns to the docker image if you just check them out or copy them inside the Plugins directory. To start off I would recommend to add the Web-Views Plugin and use avahi. Now you can navigate your browser to http://localhost:6543 to see the webviews (you need to restart the container after Plugin install – use docker stop OpenWifi and docker start OpenWifi).

What is needs to be done?

In the next section I’ll explain what should be done during Google Summer of Code. I need to prioritize these things because I’m not sure if it is possible to do everything. I think most important things are Testing, Authentication and the new graph-based database model.

Testing-Infrastructure

Currently just very few things have tests. But because it is possible to start a LEDE container in docker (there are some scripts helping to create a LEDE container in the Docker/LEDEImage directory) a lot of things are possible to test with docker orchestration. I want to provide a small LEDE image with the code to test it.

Before adding big new things I like to transfer the development to true test-driven development and having test for at least 90% of the core component code. And after that continuing development by writing tests first.

For that I would also have a look at coverage.py.

Security and authentication

There is a simplistic authorization for OpenWifi with a LDAP backend. I would like to add authorization based on user/password (without LDAP), API-Key and client side certificate (for the nodes to authenticate theirself against the API).

I would like to have the authorization as granular as possible. Authorization should check whether the authorized identity is able to operate on this node and what kind of action is allowed.

Security is provided by TLS. Last week I added the last bits to also use https for client communication – but right now it needs to be setup up by the user. I would like to add the appropriate hooks to the notification shell script.

Expand new graph-based DB-Model

The new DB-Configuration model is based on a graph – where configurations can be connected by links (the link can contain addition information – like what kind of link it is – currently the addition data is the option name (for example if you have a wifi-iface configuration the “device” links it to a wifi-device)).

The model is implemented and there is a query API to get and set options. But for communication purposes the configuration is stored as uci-json-config. There is code to convert between these two (but the one from uci to graph-model needs quite some more intelligence to detect everything right). There are also some hooks that update each part. But the update process is not consistent – the graph-based config gets a new ID for example. It would be nice to have a consistent conversion.

Furthermore I like nodes to share parts of a configuration. This should be easy to implement with some small DB changes. For this consistency is also very important. By default UCI generates unique strings for every configuration – this could be used for consistency.

The DB-Model also currently lacks creating new configurations and reordering configurations.

API

The API to modify nodes should get expanded and everything should get documented. (see above) This should be done in code and a document generated by sphinx.

I also like to implement a CLI program to use the API.

Versioning

The uci-json parser supports diffs between configurations. I would like to save a diff for each change which is applied – to have roll back configurations or delete a specific change.

There is a simplistic revisioning implemented. But the diff should be updated to a class of its own with json import and export and operations to apply a diff to a UCI configuration. (upgrade and downgrade)

Modularity and expandability

OpenWifi is right now is already quite modular – but I also want to modularize configuration parsing and communication. It would also be nice to have some interoperability with OpenWISP.

I use alembic for tracking database changes it would be nice to find a good way to use alembic for database changes needed by PlugIns as well.

Scheduled Updates

I want to schedule config updates – for example if you have a mesh you probably want to update the deepest nested nodes first and than the ones above etc. – this should be easy with celery (as long as the mesh is known and somehow represented in the database).

DynaPoint Final

Hi everyone,

this is the final blog post about DynaPoint. Short recap: I created a daemon which regularily monitors the Internet connectivity and depending on that activates and deactivates the proper access points. That way the handling with APs would become easier as you already could tell the status by the AP’s SSID. I also created a LuCI component for it to make the configuration more easy.

In the past weeks I was able to add some new features, fix bugs and complete the LuCI component. Especially the latter was really interesting and gave me some knowledge about how LuCI works.

In the last post I mentioned that it’s better to verify Internet connectivity by using wget instead of just pinging an IP address.
Consequently I switched from Pingcheck to wget. I also added an option to use curl instead of wget. With curl you also get the option to choose the interface for the connection.
When you provide internet via VPN-interface you can explicitly check the connection of that interface now. The reason why I don’t use curl as default is because of curl’s rather large size. For some routers with only 4 MB of storage it might be too much.

I also added an “offline threshold”, which will delay the switch to offline mode. So for example when you set the interval to 60 seconds and offline_threshold to 5, the switch to offline mode will be made after 5 cycles of checking (=300 seconds).

So how does an example configuration look like?

To use dynapoint just add dynapoint_rule ‘internet’ and dynapoint_rule ‘!internet’ in the desired sections in /etc/config/wireless:

config wifi-iface
    option device ‘radio0’
    option network ‘lan2’
    option mode ‘ap’
    option encryption ‘none’
    option ssid ‘freifunk’
    option dynapoint_rule ‘internet’

config wifi-iface
    option device ‘radio0’
    option network ‘lan2’
    option mode ‘ap’
    option encryption ‘none’
    option ssid ‘freifunk-maintenance’
    option dynapoint_rule ‘!internet’

The configuration of dynapoint takes place in /etc/config/dynapoint:

config rule ‘internet’
    list hosts ‘http://www.example.com’
    list hosts ‘http://www.google.com’
    option interval ’60’
    option timeout ‘5’
    option offline_threshold ‘3’
    option add_hostname_to_ssid ‘0’
    option use_curl ‘1’
    option curl_interface ‘eth0’

All of that can also be configured via LuCI:

If you want to try out DynaPoint for yourself please visit https://github.com/thuehn/dynapoint for more information.

Future work

Currently there is only support for one AP per state. In the next weeks I want to add support for multiple APs per state.
Also I want to add support for more rules. At this time there is only support for one rule “internet”. I want to make this more generic and provide support for custom rules.

Acknowledgements

I want to thank my mentor Thomas H├╝hn for his excellent mentoring and great ideas during this project. 
Also of course thanks to Freifunk for letting me realize this project and thanks to Google for organizing GSoC.

GSoC: The ECE configuration system – summary

The Google Summer of Code is almost over, so in this blog post I’ll give a overview over the targets I’ve met (and those I haven’t).

Code repositories

  • https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece/commits/gsoc2016 (daemon, client libraries, CLI client)
  • https://gitlab.com/neoraider/pkg-ece/commits/gsoc2016 (OpenWrt/LEDE package feed)
  • https://gitlab.com/neoraider/uci-ece/compare/gsoc2016-upstream…gsoc2016 (UCI ECE backend)

All code in the first two repositories has been developed by me during the GSoC. The third link shows the work I’ve done to integrate a ECE backend into libuci.

What is working

As described in earlier posts, my GSoC project was a configuration storage system for OpenWrt/LEDE, trying to solve various issues of the UCI config system. The principal points of this new system are

    • ubus-based config daemon maintaining a central storage database file
    • JSON-based configuration data model
    • Validation based on simplified JSON-Schema

The Wiki at https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece/wikis/home gives a good overview of the design and the usage of ECE and describes many features in detail. The pkg-ece package feed can be used to build and install the different components of ECE on OpenWrt/LEDE easily.

If you’ve worked with OpenWrt/LEDE, you probably know the UCI config system. A UCI config file looks like this:

config system
        option hostname 'lede'
        option timezone 'UTC'

This format is very simple: Each file (called “package”) has a number of sections (named or unnamed) of different types (this example from the “system” package has a single unnamed section of type “system”). These section contain options with single values or lists of values.

Unnamed sections are usually accessed using indices, for example a command to set the hostname would look like this:

uci set system.@system[0].hostname='betterhostname'

With the simplicity of UCI, there come various issues and missing features; these are only a few of them:

      • The fixed data model (package/section/option) makes some kinds of configuration very awkward: In the example above, the index 0 must be given for the system section, but having a second section of this kind would not make sense. In other cases, deeper configuration trees must be flattened to be stored in UCI, making the configuration harder to understand
      • All values in UCI are strings, which often causes inconsistencies (booleans are usually stored as ‘0’/’1′, but several other pairs like ‘false’/’true’ and ‘off’/’on’ are supported as well; different users of UCI sometimes parse numbers differently)
      • UCI doesn’t have built-in validation. Frontends like LuCI usually validate the entered data, but as soon as the CLI client is used, no validation is done.
      • UCI always stored the whole configuration file and not only changes from the defaults, making the storage inefficient on overlay-based filesystem setups as they are common on OpenWrt/LEDE
      • In some situations, upgrades to default values should also affect the effective values; but only if the user didn’t change the values themselves. With UCI, this is not possible, as it doesn’t store the information if a value was changed by a user.
      • UCI allows comments in config files, but they are lost as soon as libuci or the CLI tool is used to modify it

The configuration given above could be represented in ECE as this JSON document:

{
  "system": {
    "hostname": "lede",
    "timezone": "UCI"
  }
}

Note that this is only the external representation of the configuration; internally, it is stored in a more efficient binary format.

JSON gives us a lot of features for free: arbitrary configuration trees with proper data types. Existing standards and standard drafts like JSON Pointer and JSON Schema can be used to reference and validate configuration (the JSON Schema specification is simplified for ECE a bit though to allow more efficient validation on embedded systems).

The command for changing the hostname would look like this in ECE:

ece set /system/hostname '"betterhostname"'

The quoting is currently necessary to make the string a valid JSON document; this may change in a future version.

The whole configuration is saved in a single JSON document, but the specific format is not defined by a single schema; instead, each package can provide a schema, and the configuration tree is validated against a merged schema definition.

The schemas also provide default values for the configuration. Adding documentation for the configuration options to the schemas is planned as a future addition and might be used to support the user in configuration utilities and automatically generate web-based or other interfaces.

This gives only a small example for the usage of ECE, the abovementioned ECE Wiki contains much more information about the usage of ECE and the ideas behind it.

In addition to the daemon and a simple CLI utility, I’ve developed libraries for C, Lua and Shell which allow to access the configuration. While there are still some features missing (some points for future work are given in https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece/wikis/todo ), I think most of the missing pieces can be added in the near future.

The UCI/ECE bridge

When I proposed my project for the GSoC, I didn’t aim at making it a full replacement for the current UCI system, at least not in the near future. While the possibility to move some of UCI config files into the ECE config database had been my plan from the beginning, my ideas for backwards compatibility didn’t go further than a one-time import from UCI to ECE, and one-way generation of UCI config files from ECE.

After talking to a few LEDE developers and package maintainers, it became clear to me and my mentors that many people are interested in replacing UCI with a better system in the not-too-far future. But for ECE to become this replacement, a real two-way binding between UCI and ECE would be necessary to allow gradual migration, so configuration utilities like LuCI (and many other utilities somehow interacting with UCI) don’t need to be adjusted in a flag-day change.

An incomplete design draft for this UCI/ECE bridge has been outlined in https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece/wikis/design/uci-bridge . The code found in the UCI ECE backend repository linked above implements a part of this bridge (it can load “static” and “named” bindings from ECE into UCI, and commit “static” bindings back to ECE) and has been implemented as an API- and ABI-compatible extension to libuci. The development of this bridge has taken a lot of time (much more time than I had originally scheduled for UCI compatibility features), as the data models of UCI and ECE are very different.

Future work

Of all points given in https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece/wikis/todo , finalizing the database format is the most important, as any future change in the storage format will either break compatibility or involve some kind of conversion. When it is clear the format won’t be changed anymore, ECE should be added to the OpenWrt community package repository to make it easily accessible to all OpenWrt and LEDE users.

After that, other points given in the TODO should be dealt with, but none of those seem too pressing to prevent actually using ECE for some software (but some of the points given in the first section of the TODO page would need to be addressed to properly support software that requires more complex configuration).

Last, but no least, I’d like to express my gratitude to my mentors and all people in the OpenWrt, LEDE and Freifunk communities who have helped me develop ECE by giving guidance and lots of useful feedback, and to Google, who allowed me to focus on this project throughout this summer.

DynaPoint update

Hi everyone,

here are some updates regarding DynaPoint. The idea was to create a daemon, which regularily checks the Internet connection and changes the used access point depending on the result. That way the handling with APs would become easier as you already could tell the status by the AP’s SSID.

A daemon with basic functionality is already working. After installation, there is one configuration step necessary.
You have to choose in /etc/config/wireless which AP should be used, if Internet connectivity is available and which one if the connectivity is lost. You can do that by adding “dynapoint 1” or “dynapoint 0” to the respecive wifi-iface section.

You can also configure dynapoint via LuCI, although it’s not yet complete.
I was struggeling a bit with it, because the documentation of LuCI is a bit minimalistic…
Here is a screenshot of how it currently looks like:

Next steps

To verify Internet connectivity, it is probably better to make a small http download than just ping an IP address.
Using “wget –spider” should be suitable for that.

Also, I will see if I can get rid of the required configuration step in /etc/config/wireless in the next weeks and provide fully automatic configuration.

If you want to test dynapoint for yourself, just go to https://github.com/thuehn/dynapoint.

Google Summer of Code 2016: External netifd Device Handlers – Milestone 1

OVERVIEW OF THE LAST WEEKS
During the last 5 to 6 weeks I have implemented the possibility to include wireless interfaces in Open vSwitch bridges, rewritten a lot of the code for creating bridges with external device handlers and brought my development environment up to speed. I am now working with an up-to-date copy of the LEDE repository.
I have also implemented the possibility for users of external device handlers to define what information and statistics of their devices look like and to query the external device handler for that data through netifd.

CHANGES TO THE DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT
So far, I have been using quilt to create and manage patches for my alterations of the netifd code.
One day they were completely broken. I still do not know what and how it happened but it was not the first time and this time recovery would have been way too tedious.
This is why I switched to a git-only setup. I now have a clone of the netifd repo on my development machine that is symlinked into the LEDE source tree using the nice ‘enable package source tree override’ option in the main Makefile. I used the oppportunity to update both the LEDE source tree and the netifd repository to the most recent versions.
Before, I was working on an OpenWRT Chaos Calmer tree, because of a bug causing the Open vSwitch package to segfault with more recent kernels.
Now, everything is up-to-date: LEDE, netifd and Open vSwitch.

MY PROGRESS IN DETAIL

More Dynamic Device Creation
In actual coding news, I have refined the callback mechanism for creating bridges with external device handlers and the way they are created and brought up.
Previously, a bridge and its ports were created and activated immediately when /etc/config/network was parsed. Now, the ubus call is postponed until the first port on the bridge is brought up.
Because of the added asynchronicity, I had to add a ‘timeout and retry’-mechanism to keep track of the state of the structures in netifd and the external device handler.

A few questions have come up regarding the device handler interface. As I have explained in my first blog post, I am working on Open vSwitch integration into LEDE writing an external device handler called ovsd. Obviously, this is very useful for testing as well.
I have come across the issue of wanting to disable an bridge without deleting it. This means bringing down the bridge and removing the L2 devices from it. The device handler interface that I mirror for my ubus methods doesn’t really have a method for this. The closest thing is ‘hotplug remove’, which using feels a bit like a dirty hack to me.
I have reached out no netifd’s maintainer about this issue. For the meantime, I stick to (ab)using the hotplug mechanism.

On the ovsd side I have added a pretty central feature: OpenFlow controllers. Obviously, someone who uses Open vSwitch bridges is likely to want to use its SDN capabilities.
Controllers can be configured directly in /etc/config/network with the UCI option ‘ofcontrollers’:

config interface ‘lan’
        option ifname ‘eth0’
        option type ‘Open vSwitch’
        option proto ‘static’
        option ipaddr ‘1.2.3.4’
        option gateway ‘1.2.3.1’
        option netmask ‘255.255.255.0’
        option ofcontrollers ‘tcp:1.2.3.4:5678’
        option controller_fail_mode ‘standalone’

The format in which the controllers are defined is exactly the one the ovs-vsctl command line tool expects.
The other new UCI option below ofcontrollers configures the bridge’s behavior in case the configured controller is unreachable. It is a direct mapping to the ovs-vsctl command ‘set-fail-mode’. The default behavior in case of controller absence is called ‘standalone’ which makes the Open vSwitch behave like a learning switch. ‘secure’ disables the adding of flows if no controller is present.

Function Coverage: Information and Statistics
Netifd device handlers have functions to dump information and statistics about devices in JSON format: ‘dump_info’ and ‘dump_stats’. Usually, these just collect data from the structures in netifd and the kernel but with my external device handlers, it is not as simple. I have to relay the query to an external device handler program and parse the response. Since the interface is generic, I cannot hard-code the fields and types in the response. This is why I relied once more on the JSON data type description mechanism that I have already used for dynamic creation of device configuration descriptions.
In addition to the mandatory ‘config’ description, users can now optionally provide ‘info’ and/or ‘stats’ fields. Just like the configuration descriptions they are stored in the stub device handler structs within netifd where they are available to serve as blueprints for how information and statistics coming from external device handlers have to be parsed.

For my Open vSwitch setup, it currently looks like this in /lib/netifd/ubusdev-config/ovsd.json:
{
    “name” : “Open vSwitch”,
    “ubus_name” : “ovs”,
    “bridge” : “1”,
    “br-prefix” : “ovs”, 
    “config” : [
        [“name”, 3],
        [“ifname”, 1],
        [“empty”, 7],
        [“parent”, 3],
        [“ofcontrollers”, 1],
        [“controller_fail_mode”, 3],
        [“vlan”, 6]
    ],
    “info” : [
        [“ofcontrollers”, 1],
        [“fail_mode”, 3],
        [“ports”, 1]
    ]
}

This is how it looks when I query the Open vSwitch bridge ‘ovs-lan’:

THE NEXT STEPS

During the weeks to come I want to look into some issues which occurred sometimes when I disabled and re-enabled a bridge: Some protocol-realated configuration went missing. This could mean that sometimes the configured IP address was gone. Something which could help me overcome the problem is also in need of some work: reloading/reconfiguring devices.
Along with this, I want to get started with the documentation to prepare for the publication of the source code.

OpenWrt – poWquty (poWer quality): Computing and providing power quality information on OpenWrt routers.

Dear Freifunkers,

Please allow me to introduce the poWquty Project within Google Summer of Code 2016 at Freifunk.

The big picture behind this project relates to the energy production and consumption. Sustainable energy production and consumption are crucial for a prospering life on earth. The importance of energy led many theorists to even define the level of civilization by its energy profile. With the renewable energies shift the energy production paradigm from centralized to decentralized energy production which poses one of the next big challenges, which will influence the energy production in the future years.

From the big picture we move to the concrete case, increasingly faced when dealing with renewable energies: monitoring and control.
The emerging smart grids include an inherent need for communication for monitoring and control purposes in a more and more dynamic environment. One of the major challenges is monitoring the power quality parameters in a decentralized manner. In such case, decentralized information need to be retrieved and transported with the lowest latency possible. One way to solve this challenge could be to install expensive infrastructure to each point. The better way is to use wireless mesh infrastructure that could also serve this purpose.

Here where Freifunk comes in: The Freifunk mesh network is an outstanding example for a decentralized infrastructure that could be augmented with grid related functionalities to cope with future energy challenges. In order to use wireless mesh networks such as Freifunk for energy monitoring, we could use extra hardware that does the power measurements and use the wireless networks solely for transporting the information. The drawback of this is the need to install separate hardware. But, since all routers run on power, we could integrate the measurements into the router, which is the main goal of this project: to enable power quality measurements on OpenWrt.

Here is the initial plan how to do this. First we need to retrieve voltage samples from the power grid. For the beginning we will rely on an oscilloscope device that delivers the real time samples over a USB interface. This way voltage samples from the electric socket are retrieved at the router. With these voltage samples we can go ahead and calculate the power quality parameters, using moving window algorithms, fourrier transform, and z-transform to get the phase angle, the effective power, the frequency, and the harmonics. This calculation should be time, and memory efficient since it has to run on the OpenWrt embedded devices. Once these values are calculated we need to think about how we want to make them available for retrieval over IP networks.

Now we come to the Code: The goal of the project is to create an OpenWrt package which ensures three functionalities:
1-    Retrieving sample data from the measurement device
2-    Calculating power quality parameters form the retrieved samples
3-    Provisioning of the calculated parameters for retrieval

This project is intended to strengthen the role of open software in the uprising smart grids by providing some essential functionalities, communication devices need to have in the context of smart grids, especially in regard to the future role of the home routers in the future energy solutions.

More updates on this will follow in the next weeks.

Cheers,

Neez

GSoC: A new configuration system for OpenWrt/LEDE

Hi,
I’m Matthias (aka NeoRaider), and this year, I’ll participate in the Google Summer of Code for the Freifunk project.

The goal of my project is to develop an alternative to the UCI configuration system, as UCI has a number of issues that make it cumbersome to use in some situations.

One of the basic issues of UCI that affects many Freifunk (or generally community mesh) firmwares is the upgrade behaviour. Mesh firmwares usually contain elaborate default configurations, which set up network interfaces and other things to allow participating in a mesh without deep knowledge of the setup.

But this setup needs to change from time to time, as the firmware is upgraded. In the Gluon firmware framework, we usually solve this by providing upgrade scripts which modify the configuration after flashing the firmware. Writing these script is often a tedious task, and the scripts easily break when the configuration differs too much from the expected one.

But the ability to change the configuration is important for many Freifunk users: They want to change the role of ethernet ports, WLAN settings, and a lot more. But UCI doesn’t provide information how a setting was changed: if a script encounters an unexpected value, it can’t find out if it is an old default value, or was changed by the user. This often leads to a difficult choice for the script author: either to overwrite the value unconditionally, maybe disregarding voluntary configuration changes, or not to overwrite it, rendering communities unable to change certain configuration during upgrades.

My project aims at solving this by saving the user configuration independently of the defaults provided by packages. This way, a package upgrade can change the default values, but explicit user configuration will not be affected.

Another issue is that the upgrade scripts are usually part of the packages that bring the configuration. Removing a package will leave the configuration behind, which is usually a good thing (for users which know about this and may be interested in the the old config), but for mostly-automatic upgrades, old configuration may accumulate, which can quickly become problematic on devices with very limited flash.

I plan to fix this by basing the new configuration system on schema definitions, which specify which configuration options and values are valid. The schema will probably be based on JSON, as there are already lots of existing systems for defining JSON schemas, which may be used for my project or at least serve as inspiration. This will also finally provide real datatypes for the configuration and make things more consistent (finally no more 1/true/on/yes/0/false/off/no booleans!). If we want too keep the package/section/option organization of UCI, or rather allow defining schemas for any JSON structure, is still a subject of debate.

Instead of going into detail even more in this post, I’ll provide a link to my Gitlab project: https://gitlab.com/neoraider/ece

Design documents, examples for configuration and schemas, and first code will start to appear there very soon Laughing

DynaPoint – A dynamic access point validator and creator

Hi everybody,

 

I am Tobias, a Computer Science student at the TU-Berlin. I am glad to have the opportunity to participate at GSoC for Freifunk this year.

 

My project aims at making the handling with access points in OpenWrt/LEDE easier. The goal is defined as follows: Find an easily configurable solution (with reasonable defaults) for making the wireless access SSID in OpenWrt/LEDE dependent on a set of network conditions.

 

What does that mean? Consider the following example. You have a wireless access point with SSID “Freifunk”. Suddenly for whatever reason the AP looses Internet connectivity without anyone noticing it. When users now connect to this AP, expecting a working Internet connection, they get frustrated, because they can’t check their emails or surf the Internet.

 

With DynaPoint I want to develop a daemon, which regularly monitors the Internet connectivity. When it’s lost, the SSID will automatically be changed. In this example it could be changed to “Freifunk-offline”. When Internet connectivity is re-established, the SSID would automatically be changed back to “Freifunk”.

This way users as well as admins get informed about the state of an access point just by looking at the SSID.

 

To verify Internet connectivity the first obvious step would be to do a ping. For this purpose there already exists a package called pingcheck, which I am planning to use. Further steps could include DNS-Queries and HTTP-Downloads.

 

Speaking about easy configuration and reasonable defaults, I want to require as little configuration steps as possible, but also provide enough configuration options to be adjustable to different kind of setups. Ideally the configuration will also be possible via the LuCI web interface.

 

Until next time,

 

Tobias

SWOON: Simultaneous Wireless Organic Optimization within Nodewatcher

Hi everyone,

I will contribute to one of the Freifunk projects; nodewatcher, via Google Summer of Code this summer and I wanted to keep you updated on my progress as well as exchange thoughts about my ideas.

First of all, nodewatcher is an open source, modular community oriented platform used for network planning, node deployment, node monitoring and maintenance. nodewatcher was initially developed to be primarily used by the wlan slovenija project. With 1336 nodes, it’s really successful and a great example for community networks. As nodewatcher gets deployed elsewhere with even more nodes, it’s natural to ask ourselves if we can be smarter about allocating spectrum to our wireless nodes – these nodes are mostly inexpensive wireless routers but it’s natural to extend the meaning of the term to dedicated wireless access points (i.e. Unifi AP).

The theoretical foundation for this problem is fascinating by itself: Each node has a different amount of noise in each channel (the 2.4GHz band allows 3 non-overlapping channels where each channel is 20MHz wide) and each node wants to maximize its SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). I will term this as the greedy approach, which is already used in enterprise level devices. However, in an urban setting, nodes are close enough to each other for their signal to act as noise to other nodes. The greedy approach is no longer optimal as it bears a high price of anarchy. Instead, our goal is now to maximize the sum of channel capacities (under a power constraint). I will have to devise an algorithm to solve this problem and the algorithm does not seem trivial since the number of combinations is increasing exponentially with the number of nodes in the system. Even with only 10 nodes, we haveover 59000 possible allocations on 2.4GHz band and over 95 trillion on the 5GHz band.

Traditional networking literature tackles this optimization problem with Lagrange multipliers. An alternative is to look at approximate graph coloring schemes and compute chromatic numbers. I hope to experiment across various settings and approaches.
Over the course of the project, I hope to experiment with a real network which consists of at least 10 nodes and measure the improvements. One exciting thing about real life experiments is that nodewatcher was mostly used inside wlan slovenija’s network and I get to run it independently! This will probably allow me to fix some bugs on the way and contribute to nodewatcher in this aspect as well.

The algorithm will initally be developed as a nodewatcher module, but I hope to eventually port it to openwrt (possibly after the summer ends). The main difficulty is that nodewatcher can act as a central level planner, whereas the openwrt scenario requires negotiation among nodes. So it’s harder to convince a node to decrease its TX power to benefit other users. But imagine a network where nodes can communicate and achieve a socially optimal point of spectrum allocation! A glorious future awaits us.

GSoC 2014 Final – OpenWrt: IEEE 802.1ad VLAN support

Hi all!

Because I have worked very hard in the first part of GSoC, the implementation was almost done already for mid term, in the second part I have been mostly testing the code, and taking advantage of it in a lot of setups ­čÖé

The GSoC experience have been very formative to me and I would like to repeat it next year either as student or mentor ­čÖé

Moreover I’ll suggests to apply to GSoC to a lot of friends!

Many thanks to Freifunk to chose my proposal I hope you will take advantage of 802.1ad too ­čÖé

Cheers!