ninux

Implementing Pop-Routing - Midterm Updates

 

Hi Everyone!

Today has started the midterm evaluation, the deadline Is next Monday, so I have to show the work I have done ‘till now. It can be resumed in the following parts:


1) Refactoring of graph-parser and C Bindings

During the community bonding period I started working on the code of Quynh Nguyen’s M.Sc. Thesis. She wrote a C++ program capable of calculating the BC of every node of a topology [1]. I re-factored the code, and now it is a C/C++ shared Library [2]. I’ve also applied some OOP principles (Single responsibility and inheritance) and unit tests to make it more maintainable.

The interface of the library Is well defined and it can be re-used to implement another library to perform the same tasks (parsing the json and calculating the BC).


2)Prince Basic functionalities

After I completed the library a started working on the main part of the project. the daemon. We decided to call it Prince in memory of the Popstar.

This daemon connect to the routing protocol using the specific plugin (see below), calculate the BC using graph-parser, computes the timers and then it push them back using again the specific plugin. With this architecture it can be used with any routing protocol.I wrote the specific plugin for OONF and OLSRd. At the moment it has been tested with both, but I need to write a plugin for OLSRd to change the timers at runtime. For OONF I used the RemoteControl Plugin.

With these feature Prince is capable of pulling the topology, calculate the BC and Timers and push them back to the routing protocol daemon.

 

3) Additional Features: Configuration file, Dynamic plugins,

I wrote a very simple reader for a configuration file. Using the configuration file the user can specify: routing protocol host and port, routing protocol (olsr/oonf), heuristic, (un)weighted graphs.

As you can see from this Issue [3], I’m going to use INI instead of this home-made format.

As I said before I moved to a specific plugin all the protocol specific methods (pulling the topology and pushing the timers), to keep the daemon light I decided to load this plugin dynamically at runtime. So if you specify “olsr” in the configuration file just the OLSRd specific plugin will be loaded.

 

 

At the moment I consider this an “alpha” version of Prince. In the next 2 months I’ll be working on it to make it stable and well tested. The next steps will be:

 

  • Close all the Issues [4]
  • Write tests and documentation for Prince.
  • Write a plugin for OLSRd

 

Cheers, Gabriel

 

[1]: https://ans.disi.unitn.it/redmine/projects/quynhnguyen-ms

[2]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/tree/master/graph-parser

[3]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/issues/4

[4]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/issues

Implementing Pop-Routing

Hi everyone!

I am Gabriele from the Ninux community. I am participating in GSoC 2016 for the first time and I am very glad I have been accepted as a Student for Freifunk. I am from Florence, Italy. Here I’m studying Computer Science, soon I will graduate and I hope to use the results of this project to write my bachelor thesis.

Four years ago, with others community networks’ enthusiasts we have funded Ninux Firenze[1], the fist Wireless Community Network in Florence where I had the chance to learn how these networks work and to meet many others people interested in this field. The network is constantly growing, and now it counts almost 20 nodes. In May ’14 I have been for the first time to Wireless Battle of the Mesh in Leipzig where I met the Freifunk community. For this GSoC I will work on a project called PopRouting[2]:

OONF (OLSRv2) is a link state routing protocol. It works sending periodical messages to his neighbors with the aim of transmitting information about topology changes. With these information each node of the network is able to calculate the paths to reach any other destination. These messages are periodically generated, based on the configuration parameter that regulates the sending interval. A short period will make the network react rapidly but it will also cause a large overhead due to control messages. Pop Routing is a recent technique that takes advantage of the knowledge of the network topology to find the optimal value for the OONF’s timers. Using Pop Routing every node computes the “betweenness centrality” of every other node and uses it to calculate the optimal trade-off between convergence and overhead for its timers. The algorithm has been developed at the UniTN and the algorithm to compute the BC in C++ is available as free software. My goal is to code a daemon (in C) that is able to calculate autonomously the BC of the network and push it to OONF using the telnet plugin.

In this month of community bonding I have been to Wireless Battle of the Mesh v9 in Oporto(PT). There I met the OONF developers and we discussed how to implement this inside OONF. I also gave a presentation on the project. After the Battlemesh I started working on the algorithm developed by UniTN and I made a C/C++ library out of it [3].

Today I will start coding for the GSoC, stay tuned and I will give you more updates soon.

 

Gabriel

 

[1]: http://firenze.ninux.org/

[2]: https://ans.disi.unitn.it/users/maccari/assets/files/bibliography/INFOCOM2016.pdf

[3]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/tree/master/graph-parser

Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel meetup with Freifunk Community at Google Reunion

Freifunk attendees had the chance to discuss Community Networks with Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel from Intel at the Google Mentor Summit. Linus said, it was impressive to see the growth of community networks around the world and it is exciting to see so many people working on Linux for embedded devices.

Linus Torvalds, Mario Behling, Federico Capoano, Freifunk, Google Summer of Code

Netengine Google Sumer of Code Project

Hi everyone, I'm Alessandro Bucciarelli and I am participating for the first time to Google Summer of Code.
I chose to apply to work on Netengine, a project by Freifunk/Ninux. Netengine is a Python abstraction layer thought to retrieve informations about network configurations, and not only, from multiple couples of network protocols/device firmware.

Actually the main network protocols we are working on are: SNMP, SSH; with HTTP which is an idea for the immediate future.
By the firmware side there are AirOS and OpenWRT which are the most used firmwares among network devices (antennas and other) deployed inside the Ninux network.

Many of the readers, if experienced in the network field, will agree with me in saying that the retrieval of network informations (e.g IP addresses of the interface/s, MAC addresses, routing configurations) is vital.

This aspect is more than vital when you are interacting with remote devices, geographically widespread and sometimes accessible by only unskilled persons, to have a timely diagnostics of the  deployed hardware.

The module we are developing tries to solve, and I am sure it will be so, the problem of having informations from the devices REMOTELY, without any kind of further configurations and without any kind of physical interaction with the device.

For further details and code please visit https://github.com/ninuxorg/netengine or email us at ninux-dev@ml.ninux.org

Italienische Behörden fordern in Erdbebengebieten Bürger zur Öffnung ihres WLAN auf

Wie lebensrettend offene Infrastrukturen sein können, zeigt sich vor allem in Katastrophenszenarien, wie zum Beispiel momentan im Erdbebengebiet in Norditalien. Jetzt berichtet auch Spiegel Online über einen Aufruf der Behörden an die Bürger ihren WLAN-Zugang zum Internet zu öffnen, um die Kommunikation von Rettungskräften zu erleichtern.

Italiens Norden wird von Erdbeben erschüttert, die Rettungskräfte arbeiten pausenlos. Die Kommunikation ist schwierig, weil Telefon- und Handynetze teilweise zusammengebrochen sind. Nun rufen Städte und Gemeinden der betroffenen Region die Bürger auf, ihre heimischen W-Lan-Anschlüsse in freie Hotspots zu verwandeln und dafür den Passwortschutz kurzfristig aufzuheben. (http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/web/....)

Auf Republicca können die Italiener nun nachlesen, wie der Zugang geöffnet wird:

PER CONSENTIRE a tutti coloro che non riescono a comunicare via cellulare di collegarsi ad internet, molti comuni invitano i cittadini dei paesi colpiti dal terremoto di oggi ad aprire la propria rete wi-fi domestica. (http://www.repubblica.it/cronaca/2012/05/29/news/i...)

Der Kommentar von Reto Mantz dazu:

Der Fall wirft ein deutliches Schlaglicht auf die Relevanz des Zugangs zum Internet und allgemein des Zugangs zu Kommunikationssystemen. Und letztlich ist dieser Punkt auch in rechtlicher Hinsicht beachtlich: Wenn eine Kommunikationsstruktur zur Begehung von Rechtsverletzungen genutzt wird, greift potentiell das deutsche Konstrukt der Störerhaftung: Der Anschlussinhaber soll als Mitwirkender an der Rechtsverletzung des (möglicherweise unbekannten) Dritten wenigstens auf zukünftige Unterlassung haften. Nun zeigt das Beispiel der italienischen Städte und Gemeinden, dass ein offenes WLAN nicht Gefahrenquelle ist ..., sondern eine wichtige gesellschaftliche Funktion erfüllt. ... Auch wenn der Aufruf der italienischen Städte nur der vorübergehenden Öffnung von WLANs dienen soll, zeigt er doch, wie wichtig heutzutage der freie Zugang zu Kommunikationsstruktur ist, nicht nur zur Überbrückung des sog. Digital Divide. (http://www.retosphere.de/offenenetze/2012/06/02/funktion-und-bedeutung-des-wlan-acess...)

Zu hoffen bleibt, dass die Erkenntnis, wie wichtig und lebensrettend offene Netze sein können sich auch längerfristig in Italien durchsetzt. Bei vielen Bürgern ist dies bereits vor Langem angekommen. Die Bürgernetze von Ninux.org in Italien wachsen beständig. Wann wird sich diese Erkenntniss auch in der Politik in Deutschland durchsetzen und wann werden die gesetzlichen Beschränkungen und Abmahnfallen für Betreiber freier Netze endlich abgebaut?

International Community Map Project and Node Database

One of the things every community would like to see are maps of their network. There are many initiatives and map projects around, but how much more progress could we make, if we work together? This is why a group of free networks contributors started a group to work together on a common project. We started a mailing list to coordinate efforts and welcome everyone who would like to collaborate: https://lists.funkfeuer.at/mailman/listinfo/interop-dev
 
The current goal is to define a basis for a common map. We are looking at different map solutions and try to find out how we can merge the best of each into one. The best approach seems to be a modular system. In the following three great projects of different communities.
 
Nodeshot comes from the community in Italy and is widely being used there (map.ninux.org). The main developer is Federico Capoano. The goal of the Django application is to have "a nice snapshot of your wireless community network". Nodeshot is a web tool for wireless community network. It allows members to add their node and to share and manage information about their configurations like devices, ip addresses, wireless parameters etc. In this way, newcomers can easily contact/connect with them. Internal scripts will update the topology and retrieve nodes information via snmp, or parsing routing information given by olsr, batman or whatever. It is super-fast, nice and easy to use. It rises from the ashes of WNMap (sourceforge.net/projects/wnmap/), powered by django, released under GPLv3 and tested inside the Ninux wireless community network (wiki.ninux.org). How to install: A basic guide on how to setup nodeshot for your community is available here: wiki.ninux.org/InstallNodeshot
 
Nodewatcher, another Django based application was started in Slowenia by Mitar. Its main goal is the development of an open source network planning, deployment, monitoring and maintanance platform. The project is divided into multiple components:
* node telemetry provider: A simple shell script that is accessible via HTTP interface and is used for node status data acquisition that is performed by the data collection system. Its role is similar to the one of SNMP, however it uses less resources (CPU-wise and, mostly, when it comes to memory and flash space). Our firmware has this preinstalled, others can follow these instructions to install it.
* data collection system: A daemon written in Python that periodically collects data regarding the OLSR topology, active HNAs, node telemetry and performs active reachability tests for visible nodes. Using rrdtool it can then generate graphs that are used by the web interface.
* web interface: A web-based application, written in Python and using the Django framework. It is used by the users to monitor the status of the network and individual nodes and by the node owners to manage their nodes.
* firmware image generator: A daemon that handles per-node configuration and firmware image generation via the OpenWrt buildroot using our custom firmware. It receives requests from the web interface. Live version We use nodewatcher in wlan slovenija network (this is why we are developing it), so you can see a live version of nodewatcher for real deployed network here
 
yaffmap is a project from Dennis Bartsch from Freifunk Berlin. He is working on an implementation of a node database he started with a friend. It is called yaffmap. It got its name because at the beginning of the project we had many mapservers in Berlin and so it started as yet another approach for a Freifunk map. The intention was to make a server that not just produces points and lines (nodes and their links) but to gather all information that might help to understand why a link is as bad as it is. This includes to gather wireless scan results, the effective rate chosen/calculated by the wireless driver to a specific neighbour and so on. Furthermore it had to be independent from the routing-protocol and its daemons (but needs it to gather useful info) and the IP version (or even no IP version for RPs like batman) and had to be able to upload and store data from multiple routing protocols on the same node. In order to sample so much information we went the route of scripting an agent for the map-server which runs on the nodes gathering the information and uploading it through a JSON interface to the server. For link-state-protocols like OLSR we even implemented the upload of the global topology to the server, which gave us some headache. From the beginning on I stressed the need for decentralized operation, so replication between the servers was implemented and any community which wants can have their own map data server. 
 

Freifunk.net and Ninux.org accepted as Google Summer of Code Mentor Organizations

Freifunk.net and Ninux.org have been accepted as mentor organizations for the Google Summer of Code 2012. It is fantastic news that the growing international free networks community is now represented by two organizations in the study program.

If you are looking for more information on how to participate get in touch with your local wireless community or introduce your ideas on the wiki or Wlanware mailing list. People on the list will direct you to specific subprojects and contact points if needed.

Freifunk.net is an umbrella organization for wlan networks and community projects around the world and welcomes student applications for software tools to build and enhance free networks including:

* projects for routing protocols like OLSR, B.A.T.M.A.N. or other freely licensed protocols

* firmwares for routers and software for network devices

* software for network specific content creation like network CMS'

* any other network related software project

If you are a student there are important links to follow:

* Idea Page: http://wiki.freifunk.net/Ideas

* Student Check List: http://wiki.freifunk.net/Student_Check_List

* Mailing List http://freifunk.net/mailman/listinfo/wlanware

* Freifunk GSoC Page http://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/org/show/google/gsoc2012/freifunk

* Google Open Source Programs: http://socghop.appspot.com

There is an info day on March 15 in Rome. You can also meet many contributors to the community at the battle of the mesh in Athens from March 26-April 1: http://battlemesh.org/BattleMeshV5

Wireless Battle of the Mesh V3 - June 2-6, 2010 in Bracciano, Italy

The next 'Wireless Battle of the Mesh' will take place from Wed 2nd till Sun 6th of June in Bracciano (near Rome), Italy. The event aims to bring together people from across Europe to test the performance of different routing protocols for ad-hoc networks, like Babel, B.A.T.M.A.N., and OLSR. This third WBM will be improving the testbed conditions for mesh protocols with standardized testing procedures that will be reported after the event for the wireless communities.

On the development side, a flashing tool will be presented to simplify the deployment of such wireless networks based on OpenWrt stable release and packages for each protocol.

If you are a mesh networking enthusiast, community networking activist, or have an interest in mesh networks you have to check this out!

Informations about the event are gathered at: battlemesh.org

The Wireless Battle of the Mesh is an event that aims at bringing together people from across Europe to test the performance of different routing protocols for ad-hoc networks, like Babel, B.A.T.M.A.N., OLSR, and Static Routing. It is a tournament with a social character. If you are a mesh networking enthusiast, community networking activist, or have an interest in mesh networks you might want to check this out! The goal of the WirelessBattleMesh events is to set-up hands-on testbed for each available mesh routing protocol with a standard test procedure for the different mesh networks. During the different WBM events, similar hardware and software configuration will be used based on the OpenWRT BoardSupportPackage and packages for each protocol implementation. The WBM events are also a great opportunity to develop testing tools for PHY/MAC radio layers (drivers, scripts and PHY analyzers). 

Google Summer of Code: The event will also offer opportunities for students and mentors participating in Freifunk Google Summer of Code to meet up and work on projects.
 
Date
========
The "tournament" will take place from June 2-6, 2010.

Location
========
The event will take place in the camping Porticciolo in Bracciano, Italy. along the border of the lake of Bracciano, just North-West of Rome.

Registration
============
Registrations will be available at different hackerspaces (Fusolab, HSBXL, /tmp/lab, metalab, CCC, ...) and on the official website for the event at http://battlemesh.org

Fees
====
Every participant needs to donate 50 EUR (this should cover the costs for the camping, and the infrastructure). To finance this event, we ask you to pay when subscribing (paypal, bank transfer or cash).

Contact
=======
* Web: http://battlemesh.org/BattleMeshV3
* Email: contatti@ninux.org
* IRC: irc.freenode.net #battlemesh
Syndicate content