Community

Upadate on the powquty project

Dear Freifunkers,
please allow me to update you on the progress if the powquty Project within Google Summer of Code 2016 at Freifunk.

As mentioned in my last blog the goal of the project is to create a LEDE package which ensures three functionalities:

  • Retrieving sampled voltage data from the power quality measurement device via USB
  • Calculating statistical power quality parameters (such as: avg. voltage, harmonics, ect.) form the retrieved voltage samples
  • Provisioning of the calculated parameters for retrieval and graphical representation


Herein I will give a short update about the progress of these functionalities.
For this project we are using an off-the-shelf USB-based oscilloscope “WeSense” from the company A.Eberle. The oscilloscope provides real time samples of measured voltage from the power plug via USB bus, using a binary protocol and a sample frequency up to 10kHz. Initially the oscilloscopes USB bus supported the host functionality only. Hencethe router would need to act in USB device mode, which is a rather unusual mode to be supported by todays WiFi router platforms. To overcome this limitation, aforementioned company agreed to provide us with another hardware implementation that implements the USB device functionality with optional five volts power feeding functionality. The new hardware is expected on my desk in mid July.
As a counter measure for this delay, we started implementing an emulator, that locally generates a signal-samples, which are then organised in packets as similar to the binary protocol.
Regarding the calculation of the power quality parameters functionality, we successfully ported the power quality library (in Ansi C) from A.Eberle to compile and run under Linux LEDE.  The libraries functionality allows to calculate the frequency, effective voltage, harmonics, and phase shift, from the signal samples in an efficient way. We provide this library as binary blob, since it is basically not open sourced (yet), and originated from the manufacturer himself. Now it is ported for LEDE, and can be used for our purposes.
For the provisioning of the calculated parameters, we intend to implement a luci app that shows the calculated parameters.
The rest of the project timeline is depicted below:
Working phase: June 20th – July 10th

  • Finalize the emulator
  • Integration with the power quality library.
  • first prototype of the provisioning functionality

Working phase: July 11th – July 24th

  • Finalize the provisioning functionality
  • prototype implementation of sample retrieval (given that the hardware is delivered)

Working phase: July 25th – August 7th

  • Integration of the three functionalities into a working implementation
  • Software Testing and bug fixing
  • Documentation of the integrated  functionalities

Working phase: August 8th – August 21st

  • Buffer for possible delays


More updates in the upcoming weeks.
BR,
Neez

Implementing Pop-Routing - Midterm Updates

 

Hi Everyone!

Today has started the midterm evaluation, the deadline Is next Monday, so I have to show the work I have done ‘till now. It can be resumed in the following parts:


1) Refactoring of graph-parser and C Bindings

During the community bonding period I started working on the code of Quynh Nguyen’s M.Sc. Thesis. She wrote a C++ program capable of calculating the BC of every node of a topology [1]. I re-factored the code, and now it is a C/C++ shared Library [2]. I’ve also applied some OOP principles (Single responsibility and inheritance) and unit tests to make it more maintainable.

The interface of the library Is well defined and it can be re-used to implement another library to perform the same tasks (parsing the json and calculating the BC).


2)Prince Basic functionalities

After I completed the library a started working on the main part of the project. the daemon. We decided to call it Prince in memory of the Popstar.

This daemon connect to the routing protocol using the specific plugin (see below), calculate the BC using graph-parser, computes the timers and then it push them back using again the specific plugin. With this architecture it can be used with any routing protocol.I wrote the specific plugin for OONF and OLSRd. At the moment it has been tested with both, but I need to write a plugin for OLSRd to change the timers at runtime. For OONF I used the RemoteControl Plugin.

With these feature Prince is capable of pulling the topology, calculate the BC and Timers and push them back to the routing protocol daemon.

 

3) Additional Features: Configuration file, Dynamic plugins,

I wrote a very simple reader for a configuration file. Using the configuration file the user can specify: routing protocol host and port, routing protocol (olsr/oonf), heuristic, (un)weighted graphs.

As you can see from this Issue [3], I’m going to use INI instead of this home-made format.

As I said before I moved to a specific plugin all the protocol specific methods (pulling the topology and pushing the timers), to keep the daemon light I decided to load this plugin dynamically at runtime. So if you specify “olsr” in the configuration file just the OLSRd specific plugin will be loaded.

 

 

At the moment I consider this an “alpha” version of Prince. In the next 2 months I’ll be working on it to make it stable and well tested. The next steps will be:

 

  • Close all the Issues [4]
  • Write tests and documentation for Prince.
  • Write a plugin for OLSRd

 

Cheers, Gabriel

 

[1]: https://ans.disi.unitn.it/redmine/projects/quynhnguyen-ms

[2]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/tree/master/graph-parser

[3]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/issues/4

[4]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/issues

Monitoring and quality assurance of open wifi networks out of client view (midterm evaluation)

Hey everyone,
 
Now we are on the midterm evaluation. I would like to tell you what I have done so far and what will come next. In the first post [0] I explained the work packages. In this post I will come back to the work packages  and show you what I have done for each package.
 
The first sub-project was the hoodselector. At the beginning of the work period I did some bugfixing for the hoodselector so that we where able to deploy the hoodselector in our live environment. The hoodselector creates decentralized, semi automated ISO OSI layer 2 network segmentations. You can find a detailed discription here [0]. Retrospective I can say that the deploymend of the hoodsystem went without any major problems opposed to my first expectations. Currently we have 4 hoods active. Around Oldenburg(Oldb), Ibbenbüren, Osnabrück and Friesland. More hoods will follow in future. Open Issues can be find here [1].
 
The second sub-project was to create a propper workaround for building images with the continuous-integration (CI) system of Gitlab using make on multiple cores.
The Freifunk Nordwest firmware now has automatically built testing images that are not only build on a single core but can be built on multiple cores. And the architecture targets are also autogenerated out of the sourcecode. This makes it possible to generate images dynamically for all targets also including new targets that may come in the future. I implemented a small algorithm that manages the thread counter of make commands. I use the number of CPUs out of /proc/cpuinfo * 2 this means for each logic core will follow two threads. In example our runner02.ffnw.de server has 8 cores so the CI build process will automatically build with 16 Threads [2]. Here is an example of a passed buildprocess with our CI builder[3]. Actually it is not possible to build images with a high verbose output, because the CI logfiles will get to big. That makes it impossible to use the webfrontend for analyzing the buildprocesses. I opened an issues for this and discussed the problem with the gitlab developers [4].
The CI builder is very helpful for the developing process of the monitoring drone.
 
Following I would like to report about our first hacking seminar.
The first hacking seminar was on 28.05.2016. We started with two presentations. One about Wireless Geo Location and the second one about the Hoodselector. We recorded the presentation with our new recording equipment [7] bought using some of the money for the mentoring organisation and uploaded the recordings to youtube [5].
 
The first presentation was about geolocating with wireles technologies.
Based on the Nordwest Freifunk geolocator [6]

The second presentation was about the function of the Hoodselector

 
After this two presentations we had a smal disscussion about the presentation topics and than we started o
ur hacking session where the developers started coding on their projects.
 
Now all sub-Projects are finnisched and I will continue with the Monitoring Drone Project after I finish my Study exams. Also the date of next hacking seminar is set for 9th of Juli 2016. Again we will have two presentations. One on Gitlab CI and one about how to use our new Puppet Git repositories including the submodule feature. The presentations will be recorded and after the presentation we will have a coding session like last time.
 
Timeline:
23. May: Community Bonding (3 weeks)
test and deploy hoodselector  <- Done
16. May 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble  <- Done
Refine the roadmap  <- Done
23. May – 20. June: Work period 1 (4 weeks) <- Done
28. May 2:00 PM: hacker-session  <- Done
  1. Presentation about the hoodselector <- Done
  2. Presentation about the openwifi.su project[4] and the geolocator <- Done
13. June 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble  <- Done
Midtermevaluation
Tarek & Clemens exams!!!
20. June – 15. August: Work period 2 (8 weeks)
9. July 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. Presentation about workaround with git CI processes.
  2. Presentation about puppet deployment system
13. June 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
25. June 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. Presentation about workaround with git CI processes.
  2. Presentation about puppet deployment system
18. July 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
30. July 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. actual unknown
  2. actual unknown
15. August 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
Finalevaluation
 

SWOON: Simultaneous Wireless Organic Optimization within Nodewatcher - in the middle of the road.

Hi everyone,

This is my first update on working on SWOON, an algorithm to automatically allocate channels to nodes in nodewatcher. Not a lot of time has passed since I started working and but the wlanslovenija community was immensely helpful in getting me started. Up to now, I only worked on my own coding projects, where I got to be the main architect behind the codebase. I decided where functions were defined, I decided on the coding style, I did code reviews and I was the one to approve branch merges (of which there were none, because I wrote all the code :-) ). Now, GSoC threw me in the middle of a well established open source project where you have to get accustomed to existing coding practices. And accustoming to this was more difficult than I expected. So people from wlanslovenija had to be really patient with me (and I think they'll have to keep this up for a while :-) ). But I slowly got the hang of it. My overarching plan for the algorithm is to first read the data, then process the data and finally issue a warning to those who maintain nodes with inefficient channel allocations. My work on reading the data from nodes is almost done (almost because a new amazing feature was suggested only yesterday!). On a tangent, I think this shows another immense benefit of community oriented projects - everyone's free to suggest additional features that would make this process more eficient. To get the data about neighboring nodes, one has to temporarily turn the wireless radios off. Because of that, nodewatcher-agent only performs a survey of neighbors every two hours. But we collect data much more regularly. So how do we deal with this? My current implementation simply stores the data into the database every hour and it does not take into account the age of the data. I will now work on comparing the current datapoint with the latest one and only insert it into the datastream if the data has changed. This will reduce the space we're using and could even be expanded for use by other modules. It's great to know that you can contribute to any aspect of the project. Mitar, a senior developer of nodewatcher, said that they built all of it themselves, so we can rewrite anything as well.

I also worked on a parallel implementation of the mechanism, which read the data from old dumps. This gave me the insight into the architecture that made writing the actual implementation much easier.

My next steps are to finish the data collection part and create a module to analyze this data. This is exciting for everyone because there's no documentation about writing such modules so I'll get to be the first one to do it! I can only hope I'll document it well enough to make the process easier for those who will follow as new members in the community. The github PR can be found here.

Overview: GSoC projects at freifunk.net

Monitoring and quality assurance of open wifi networks out of client view

Hey everyone,
 
My name is Jan-Tarek Butt and I am in my second term of computer science at Emden University in Lower Saxony (Germany). I am one of the students that are participating for Freifunk in the Google Summer of Code 2016. In the following post I would like to introduce you to my Google Summer of Code project. I split up the project into 3 main subjects: Mainline project, sub-projects and seminars.
 
Before I explain the three mentioned subjects I would like to give you some background information about the project in general. My project mentor is Clemens John. He studies computer science at University Osnabrück in Lower Saxony (Germany) and recently started to write his bachelor thesis. As part of his bachelor thesis he will build a monitoring and administration software for open wireless networks called "Netmon-SC" based on a previosly existing software that will be rewritten to follow a decentralised idea. The coarse structure of Netmon-SC will consist of a core module as a data storage backend that can be queried by using a REST API based on NetJSON. In addition to the REST API the core module will include a plug-In system which developers can use to easily extend the core module to build data storages for creating visualisation tools, quality assurance metrics or any other community specific tools like special administration applications.
 
My mainline GSoC project is to develop a new firmware for routers based on openWRT or LEDE. This firmware will  be the basis for an application to monitor the clients view onto an open wireless network. From now on we will call this firmware the "Monitoring-Drone". This monitoring firmware will gather quality assurance metrics and send them to Netmon-SC. This metrics will help developers and administrators to enhance the quality of open wireless networks and find bugs more easier. The firmware will include an API package to communicate with Netmon-SC. It will also contain a small LUCI web-interface for basic configuration e.g. wireless network settings etc. Additionally to the basic settings it should be possible to integrate small plugins in form of  .sh or .lua files witch contain custom commands.This will allow communities to gather network specifics metrics without compiling community specific firmware images. The API for communication with Netmon-SC, the web-interface and the plugin system will embedded into a package bases structure. The git repository for this project can be found here.
 
Now to the sub-projects. Sub-projects are small projects adjacent to the mainline project. The first sub-project is the so called hoodselector that I finished reviewing on Mai 21th. The hoodselector creates decentralized, semi automated ISO OSI layer 2 network segmentations based on geostationary fixed quadrants for batman-adv mesh networks. It detects in which quadrant the node is in by using wireless location services and configurates the router using the settings that have been stored for this quadrant. In conclusion the hoodselector enables us to build scaled decentralised mesh-networks. It is a small program on open wireless routers on the Nordwest-Freifunk community network.
 
The second sub-project is, to create a proper workaround for building images on a multicore system instead of a single core system by using Gitlabs continuous-integration (CI) feature. This will fully automate the firmware image building process for the Monitoring-Drone and also for the open wireless firmware images from the local community.
 
The third sub-project are regular seminars. The idea of this seminars is to give earned knowledge to the public and also acquire new developers for open wireless projects. The seminars should have one or two short presentations about technical processes from open wireless networks, for instance how the hoodselector works or how batman-adv works. The Presentations will be video recorded and uploaded to the internet. After thous presentations on the seminars I plan short discussions about the contend of the presentations. Afterwards hack-sessions should do force forward the developing processes for the Google Summer of Code project and illuminate the opensource software development scene of the open wireless project.
 
Last but not least we created a project timeline. Clemens and I, will have regular Mumble meetings during the GSoC, at the middle of every month. On this meetings we will discuss the work already done and what should happen next. Beside the work on the main project we will also use the meetings to plan the next seminar that will always follow at the end of each month.
 
Timeline:
23. May: Community Bonding (3 weeks)
test and deploy hoodselector  ← Done
16. May 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble ← Done
Refine the roadmap ← Done
23. May – 20. June: Work period 1 (4 weeks)
28. May 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. Presentation about the hoodselector
  2. Presentation about the openwifi.su project and the geolocator
Midtermevaluation
20. June – 15. August: Work period 2 (8 weeks)
Tarek & Clemens exams!!!
13. June 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
25. June 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. Presentation about workaround with git CI processes.
  2. actual unknown
18. July 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
30. July 2:00 PM: hacker-session
  1. actual unknown
  2. actual unknown
15. August 6:00 PM: GSoC Mumble
Finalevaluation

Cheers
Jan-Tarek Butt

Implementing Pop-Routing

Hi everyone!

I am Gabriele from the Ninux community. I am participating in GSoC 2016 for the first time and I am very glad I have been accepted as a Student for Freifunk. I am from Florence, Italy. Here I’m studying Computer Science, soon I will graduate and I hope to use the results of this project to write my bachelor thesis.

Four years ago, with others community networks’ enthusiasts we have funded Ninux Firenze[1], the fist Wireless Community Network in Florence where I had the chance to learn how these networks work and to meet many others people interested in this field. The network is constantly growing, and now it counts almost 20 nodes. In May ’14 I have been for the first time to Wireless Battle of the Mesh in Leipzig where I met the Freifunk community. For this GSoC I will work on a project called PopRouting[2]:

OONF (OLSRv2) is a link state routing protocol. It works sending periodical messages to his neighbors with the aim of transmitting information about topology changes. With these information each node of the network is able to calculate the paths to reach any other destination. These messages are periodically generated, based on the configuration parameter that regulates the sending interval. A short period will make the network react rapidly but it will also cause a large overhead due to control messages. Pop Routing is a recent technique that takes advantage of the knowledge of the network topology to find the optimal value for the OONF’s timers. Using Pop Routing every node computes the “betweenness centrality” of every other node and uses it to calculate the optimal trade-off between convergence and overhead for its timers. The algorithm has been developed at the UniTN and the algorithm to compute the BC in C++ is available as free software. My goal is to code a daemon (in C) that is able to calculate autonomously the BC of the network and push it to OONF using the telnet plugin.

In this month of community bonding I have been to Wireless Battle of the Mesh v9 in Oporto(PT). There I met the OONF developers and we discussed how to implement this inside OONF. I also gave a presentation on the project. After the Battlemesh I started working on the algorithm developed by UniTN and I made a C/C++ library out of it [3].

Today I will start coding for the GSoC, stay tuned and I will give you more updates soon.

 

Gabriel

 

[1]: http://firenze.ninux.org/

[2]: https://ans.disi.unitn.it/users/maccari/assets/files/bibliography/INFOCOM2016.pdf

[3]: https://github.com/gabri94/poprouting/tree/master/graph-parser

SWOON: Simultaneous Wireless Organic Optimization within Nodewatcher

Hi everyone,

I will contribute to one of the Freifunk projects; nodewatcher, via Google Summer of Code this summer and I wanted to keep you updated on my progress as well as exchange thoughts about my ideas.

First of all, nodewatcher is an open source, modular community oriented platform used for network planning, node deployment, node monitoring and maintenance. nodewatcher was initially developed to be primarily used by the wlan slovenija project. With 1336 nodes, it's really successful and a great example for community networks. As nodewatcher gets deployed elsewhere with even more nodes, it's natural to ask ourselves if we can be smarter about allocating spectrum to our wireless nodes - these nodes are mostly inexpensive wireless routers but it's natural to extend the meaning of the term to dedicated wireless access points (i.e. Unifi AP).

The theoretical foundation for this problem is fascinating by itself: Each node has a different amount of noise in each channel (the 2.4GHz band allows 3 non-overlapping channels where each channel is 20MHz wide) and each node wants to maximize its SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). I will term this as the greedy approach, which is already used in enterprise level devices. However, in an urban setting, nodes are close enough to each other for their signal to act as noise to other nodes. The greedy approach is no longer optimal as it bears a high price of anarchy. Instead, our goal is now to maximize the sum of channel capacities (under a power constraint). I will have to devise an algorithm to solve this problem and the algorithm does not seem trivial since the number of combinations is increasing exponentially with the number of nodes in the system. Even with only 10 nodes, we haveover 59000 possible allocations on 2.4GHz band and over 95 trillion on the 5GHz band.

Traditional networking literature tackles this optimization problem with Lagrange multipliers. An alternative is to look at approximate graph coloring schemes and compute chromatic numbers. I hope to experiment across various settings and approaches.
Over the course of the project, I hope to experiment with a real network which consists of at least 10 nodes and measure the improvements. One exciting thing about real life experiments is that nodewatcher was mostly used inside wlan slovenija's network and I get to run it independently! This will probably allow me to fix some bugs on the way and contribute to nodewatcher in this aspect as well.

The algorithm will initally be developed as a nodewatcher module, but I hope to eventually port it to openwrt (possibly after the summer ends). The main difficulty is that nodewatcher can act as a central level planner, whereas the openwrt scenario requires negotiation among nodes. So it's harder to convince a node to decrease its TX power to benefit other users. But imagine a network where nodes can communicate and achieve a socially optimal point of spectrum allocation! A glorious future awaits us.

Syndicate content